New Psychic Frontiers


Walter and Mary Jo Uphoff
Colin Smythe Limited, 1975 - ISBN 0901072176



  • p. 47

    Another recent psychic marvel to come on the scene is a young Israeli, Uri Geller, who until recently had devoted his talents to entertainment.  At first hearing, accounts of his feats produce disbelief.  He can bend and break a table fork by looking at it, crumble a ring held in another person's hand, stop, start, and repair clocks and watches by staring at them, drive a car blindfolded through a busy street (if another person in the car keeps his eyes open and watches the traffic, not to mention other simpler things such as reproducing drawings sealed in triplicate envelopes and correctly identifying objects concealed in containers about which neither he nor the experimenter have knowledge.  Uri performs best spontaneously in sympathetic company and says that doing experiments in severely controlled conditions is "very hard, very difficult," but he has cheerfully cooperated with Dr. Edgar D. Mitchell, the Stanford Research Institute, and with Dr. Andrija Puharich, the New York neurologist and parapsychologist who was instrumental in bringing him to the United States.

    Dr. Mitchell, who has appeared with Geller on network TV shows, says of him:

    An evening with Geller is likely to produce an assortment of bent rings, bent and broken silverware, mysteriously lost articles and mysteriously found articles ... To produce by sleight-of-hand the range of phenomena that one can observe on a typical social evening would itself be a phenomenon equivalent to any Uri Geller seems to produce.

    Geller has shown ESP ability since childhood when he would tell his mother where she had been, or how much money she had won at cards.  He thinks that he is a channel for some extraterrestrial power that works through him in some way.  The possibilities for experimentation with this talented young sensitive (he prefers not to be called a psychic) seem almost endless.

  • p. 178-9

    Although not strictly a case of metal bending, we can report that at Sherman's 1976 Workshop in St. Louis, we took along a "junk" watch which Jeff Bergey, a jeweller in Oregon, Wisconsin, had disabled by breaking one end of the ballance pivot.  "Let's see what he [Geller] can do with that!" he said.  Walter had taken his father's gold watch which had not run for more than thirty years to get Bergey's evaluation of it before taking it to St. Louis where Geller was to be a featured lecturer. A majority of several hundred watches deposited on the stage started running during Geller's program.  Mary Jo, who held the "junk" watch in her hand while the audience joined Geller in exhorting the watches to "work!" was absolutely astonished when that watch started running.  Incidentally, Walter's father's watch never started.  The "junk" watch ran for thirteen hours, stopping shortly after Walter showed it to David Hoy, a well-known psychic and competitor of Geller's.



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