Uri Geller - a bibliography - homepage


The Guardian - 31 October 1975


Geller, the human electric eel



 URI GELLER really can bend forks and spoons, and he does it by some means as yet unknown to science, two leading research physicists claimed yesterday.
 Professor John Hasted, of Birkbeck College, and professor John Taylor, of King’s College, both of the University of London, have been carrying out independent experiments this year with Geller and with a number of British children who claim to have similar powers. Some of the children, the scientists confirm, can bend metal too, although rather less effectively than the young Israeli.
 Both Hasted and Taylor have submitted reports on their preliminary findings to Nature magazine for assessment and eventual publication, they announced yesterday. Both are continuing their research into metal-bending, and five or six other British universities are running parallel projects. “But they have managed so far to keep out of the public eye,” Professor Taylor said.
 Professor Hasted explained why he chose to speak out yesterday for the first time. “It is that scientists stood up to be counted on this issue,” he said. “A series of things have happened when Mr Geller was in our laboratory. We have not only worked with keys and so on but with metal objects in capsules. We have identified the metal objects and controlled our tests very carefully.”
 He believes that Geller softens the metal, which bends because it is softened rather than because of direct pressure. “I am quite confident that science will get to the bottom of it,” he said. “Of course, science may be changed.”
 Professor Taylor said that he had found that metal could be bent without sufficient pressure being applied, and in some cases without the subject under test actually touching the metal at all.“This is inexplicable in science.
 “Our basic problem now is not to ask whether the phenomenon can occur but how it occurs. It is a very important phenomenon – it will tell us new things about human beings. The problem of understanding it will be one of the most exciting pieces of research of the next few years.”
 During Uri Geller’s tests at King’s College, Professor Taylor said he had been placed in front of a Geiger counter which had “showed 500 times above background.” This indicated a reading well above the danger level, and if it had been interpreted to mean that Geller was packed full of radioactivity the building would have been evacuated on the grounds of safety. He did not, however, believe that Geller was radioactive since such a level of contamination would have shown grave physical side-effects.


This article contains copyrighted material that has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. It is being made available for the general purpose of criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching and/or research. I believe that use of this material is covered under the terms of "fair use". If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes other than that provided by law, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

Uri Geller - a bibliography - homepage